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Showing posts with label getting into modeling. Show all posts
Showing posts with label getting into modeling. Show all posts

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Model Mishaps and Nightmare Castings


On the printed page modeling looks glamorous, filled with luxury products and fashion, gorgeous makeup and hair, and most people think the model was pampered into these looks and just had to show up and be beautiful, and then get paid.  The reality is, it takes so much to actually get to the point where a photo appears in a publication or a model walks down the runway.  Rather than just having a rant about the injustices and abuses in the modeling world, I wanted to share with you some of the cringe-worthy stories I have heard from my model friends over the years.  We laugh about these things now but they were anything but funny when they happened.

It’s all fun and games until someone gets hurt, right?  One model friend was working on set in Japan and had a large light fall on her head - ouch - and on another occasion had to work with a very nasty monkey that wanted nothing to do with her - yikes.  Another friend became sick with a high fever while on a shoot for a magazine in Algeria, but the shoot went on.  Only when the magazine came out did she see that in one shot she was standing bare foot in broken glass, in a shot she can’t remember even doing.  Noticing a trend here?  It can’t be overstated enough how important it is for models to have travel health insurance.  It is as important as your passport and ticket!  

A couple of my friends who worked with Armani had equal parts reverence for the famed fashion house and fear, both of the casting process and of the actual work.  Armani has it’s own showroom complete with runway which is lit from underneath.  Models of all shapes and descriptions on the casting were provided with a sheer bodysuit that they had to wear without anything more than a small g-string underneath, and walk the runway barefoot in front of the casting directors and often Armani himself, all of whom sat under lights at the end of the runway to conceal their expressions.  The models in the dressing room waited for their turns while trying to maintain their modesty, everyone looking down or away and feeling intensely awkward.  Let’s be clear that models are often down to their strings in front of stylists and dressers, but when they are actually being paid for a booking, and not just in front of a bunch of other models on a casting waiting to seal their fate with a barefoot, nearly naked walk down a runway in front of people you can’t even see. 

The casting wasn’t the only situation the brought fear to these models.  One had to wear shoes that were two sizes too large for her and naturally one shoe fell off while walking on the runway in front of a group of Japanese buyers – she smiled, picked up the shoe and continued her walk – what else could she do?  Armani himself came charging into the dressing room raging at her and the dressers and before the model could pack up to leave, her agency had been called and she was in hot water.  When it was realized that the model was only given shoes that were clearly not her size and forced to wear them even though it was impossible, she was reinstated.  Imagine the feeling walking into the salon the next time to work, receiving glaring looks from the dressers??  Nerves of steel!

Sometimes a model doesn’t even get to the set before a drama unfolds.  Nearly all my model friends have had a hair stylist who burned the tips of their ears or their neck with a hot curling or straightening iron, another had one hair stylist actually coat her hair with Vaseline to glue it down (she thought it was gel).  It is no easy feat to remove Vaseline from hair and it finally took repeat washings with a grease-cutting dish detergent to remove it from her hair.  Stylists who pinch, poke pins into a model, or mumble about her or him under their breath, or editors and art directors who talk about them thinking they are deaf and can’t hear them, are all hazards of the business and woe to the model who lets these things ruin the experience for her.  For every horror story there are lots of great experiences models can have working, traveling, and learning about the fashion, beauty and branding businesses. 


There are as many modeling mishaps as there are models and I will share more in the future.  On-set horror stories from the point of view of photographers, make-up artists, and stylists are just as numerous and I will share those too.

Next time you look at those glossy pages with those stunning unicorns in gorgeous fashion, consider that there might have been a nightmare casting before the model actually booked the job, a stylist who brought the wrong sizes, a hair stylist who had too much caffeine, a makeup artist who didn’t clean their brushes and had pink eye herself, and maybe even an editor who had a vision they couldn’t express and no one understood.  These images don’t come easy – they are just supposed to look like they did.

                                                               XOXO  Shelley


#modeling mishaps #nightmare castings #modeling business #getting into modeling #fashion business #modeling isn’t as easy as it looks #facethis.blogspot.com #Shelley Goodstein
 




Friday, May 19, 2017

Modeling Biz: What Makes an “It” Girl?

The parameters of what constitutes beauty are shifting, finally, opening the doors of the modeling industry to faces and body types that don’t fall into the typical looks that have traditionally populated the modeling agencies, runways, campaigns, and editorials for so long. While the definition of what makes a girl a beautiful model is changing and broadening, there is no denying that the models who rise to the top in a sea of long-legged women with squared off shoulders, high cheekbones, and wide-set eyes, have to possess something more, something that can only be described as “it”.  So what is “it”?


Ask industry pros and they will all tell you something different, be it a unique look that can be transformed while the model remains recognizable, a model with a great personality, personal style, drive and determination, or simply a “spark”.  Maybe it’s a combination of all of these, or even a model with a look that symbolizes where culture and fashion are that that moment in time. 


However it is defined, there is no denying that there is always some unique quality that makes one model special amongst thousands.  Naomi, Cindy, Claudia, Christy, and Linda, supermodels of the 80’s and 90’s, became so famous that the world refers to them to this day by their first names.  No two were alike or interchangeable, and all had “it” in spades. 


Kate Moss is perhaps the most famous model who embodied “it” as she broke nearly all the beauty standards of the early to mid-nineties with her boyish figure, her short stature (5’6”), wide-set doe eyes and freckles.  She was the antithesis of the Amazonian supermodels with womanly beauty and bodies.  Discovered at age fourteen by Sarah Dukakis of Storm Models UK in the JFK Airport, she must have stirred something in the agent’s gut that this girl would change the industry and turn it on it’s ear.  How else to explain her interest in a small, thin, girl barely in puberty?  Because, she had “it” and Dukakis felt it. No matter where the fashion industry was at that moment, Kate Moss changed it forever, ushering in the entirely new era of the waif, youthful sexuality, and a stripped back, uncontrived, raw beauty that endured until the arrival of the Brazilian bombshells of the late 90’s.


The best scouts and agents are always on the lookout for the next model possessing this elusive quality, knowing that they might, if they are lucky, find just one in their entire careers.  Many models have “promise” but rarely “it”. “It” cannot be cultivated, taught, or created.  “It” is often so out of the scope of traditional beauty standards that it triggers a gut feeling that there are models where to whom the beauty standards of the business do not apply.  But to think having “it” is a golden ticket to success would be a mistake.  Without the best agency that has the right industry connections, without a strong work ethic, without a great support network, without amazing timing, “it” doesn’t matter.  “It” takes a village to succeed.  Every single day in every corner of the world, scouts, agents and casting directors are on the hunt for that elusive girl that has “it”.  She is so rare that the chances of finding her are slim.  But when they find her it’s like catching lightning in a bottle. 

                                                             XOXO  Shelley 

#modeling business #what makes an “it” girl? #model scouting #what makes a supermodel? #getting into modeling #how to break into modeling #modeling 101 #facethis.blogspot.com #Shelley Goodstein





Monday, May 15, 2017

Modeling 101: Arrive "Beauty-Ready"

It may go without saying but personal hygiene is ALWAYS a big deal where modeling is concerned, after all you are hired to represent a brand or publication and no matter what your level of success you have been selected and are being paid to represent at the highest level.  How you arrive on set or backstage counts, and it doesn’t go unnoticed if your personal care beforehand is a little haphazard.  Finding yourself nearly naked and without hair and makeup is laying it all out there for the makeup artist, hair stylist and wardrobe stylist to see, and yes they notice that less than discreet tattoo, the nasty hair extensions, unwashed hair, body-piercings, unshaven legs, nicks, bruises, bad hair-dye job, un-manicured fingernails and toes, zits, and tan lines – ALL OF IT! And it matters!  If you care so little about your own personal image how can you expect a client to think you care about their brand image?


It’s not enough to expect the hair and makeup people to cover all these nasty problems, or to “fix” your hair issues, give you a mani-pedi, or simply expect that the photographer’s retoucher is going to just quickly fix these issues in post-production.  One of the quickest ways to get off on a bad footing on a job is give these problems over to the team as if it were their problem.  It’s not their responsibility, but yours.  And they will hesitate to book you again, or possibly report this to your agency. More than anything it is disrespectful to the team and the client and reflects badly on you. 

I have spoken to photographers and makeup artists about these issues and if a model arrives with any of these problems without the agency or model warning ahead of time that “’so-and-so model fell down the stairs and has bruises on her shins”, or “so-and-so model has had a breakout on her face from frequent traveling this past week”, then it’s not acceptable, and most likely a call will be made to the booker.  Makeup artists are completely grossed out by dirty hair, badly done hair extensions that haven’t been removed and washed in weeks and create bumps around the head, chewed off nails, and bad body shaving. 

You are hired to arrive as a blank canvas, ready to be made up into the representation of the brand. It is your brand collaborating with theirs and the responsibility for a great outcome is as much your responsibility as theirs. 

A profession model knows to:

Hair:  arrive with clean hair, properly cut, and with hair extensions removed and cleaned.

Face: fuzz-free, eyebrows tidy, clean face, and facial skin maintained so as to be free of pimples and redness – avoid any dermatological treatments within a few days of a booking in case there is a reaction.

Body:  remove all piercings, wax, or use your chosen hair-removal method; wear sunscreen on exposed skin daily to avoid any tan lines and discoloration, arms and d├ęcolletage included.  If you have bruises, apply arnica regularly to expedite the healing process, and use over-the-counter creams and gels on cuts and scars to heal and reduce their appearance.

Nails:  either learn how to give yourself a clean, simple, clear-colored manicure and pedicure, or book an appointment.  Long or fake nails are out.  Clear or nude shades are best since the makeup artist might need to use a particular color for the project. 

Tattoos:  lots of models have them and most of them know that a tattoo needs to be small and discreetly situated.  Have your own tattoo-covering body makeup in a color that matches your skin tone ready, but don't apply it beforehand as it might come off on the clothes you have to wear for the photos or the show.  Offer it to the makeup artist so they can cover your tattoo in a way it won't soil the styling.

We are all human, models included, and our skin does break out, we get bruises, and we sometimes have forgotten to wear sunscreen, but if you keep yourself generally photo-ready and maintain your hair, nails and complexion, then when something does go awry, an honest comment to the agency to give a potential client a heads-up before a booking can go a long way and shows you are committed to the job and professional.  

Remember it is your job to arrive ready to go and it is not just your personal beauty day to have a free mani-pedi, or free hair trim, or free facial.  More than anything it is just a matter of personal hygiene that is maintained.  It is never okay to expect that any of these issues will be fixed by the beauty team or by the retoucher.  It is not their job.  It’s yours. 

                                                             XOXO  Shelley


#modeling 101 #how to be a professional model #modeling tips #getting into modeling #beauty tips for modeling #modeling: what not to do #professional model beauty tips #facethis.blogspot.com  #Shelley Goodstein





Thursday, May 26, 2016

How to Know Your “Market” as a Model - Editorial vs Commercial Modeling


So an agent just told you that your market is editorial, not commercial, and you have no idea what that means.  Knowing what the markets are and where you “fit” is key to building a successful career.


The “market” not only refers to the different types of modeling, but also the various cities around the world where models go for work.  First you need to understand the different types of modeling, and subsequently the cities that are predominant for each type of work.  


“Editorial” or “Fashion”

These models shoot for magazines and high fashion campaigns, and walk the runways during fashion weeks in Paris, London, NYC, and Milano, and sometimes in smaller fashion cities like Tokyo, Sydney, or Sao Paolo.  This is a fast-paced market where top models compete for a limited number of opportunities.  




Timing and a great agent are everything.  It requires nerves of steel to handle the rejection, the long hours, distant travel that can be lonely, and the physicial requirements.  It is a lot to handle on very young shoulders.  These models have to be tall, willowy and have the ability to be transformed by designers and editoris into the “look of the season”.  Getting editorial and runway work, often for very little money, is the risk fashion models take in aiming for a major career.  It is essential that these models appear in the shows of the top designers, which puts them in front of the most powerful magazine editors, in hopes of being noticed and selected for prestigious editorials.  Exposure is key and any income takes a back seat until (and if!) a model becomes a “name” and they begin to book campaigns.






“Commercial”

The commercial modeling market has a broader range in both body type and age, and these models can have quite a long career.  This market can also be a training ground for new faces to give them the time and opportunity to learn the business and to gain confidence in front of the camera and potential clients.  Commercial modeling can be broken down into specific types of modeling such as swimwear, juniors, lifestyle, and catalogue. These markets exist all over the world and these models tend to travel on bookings, and also for extended stays in certain cities such as L.A., Miami, Chicago, Hamburg, Singapore, Tokyo, and Hong Kong. London, Paris, NYC, and Milano also have commercial work and often the fashion editorial models are able to take advantage of this to ear some money between magazine editorials and runway work.  Commercial models have the chance to develop longer relationships with agents and can follow the work seasonally around the world.  It is a great way to travel, and experience life abroad, while hopefully(!) earning some money.  



Both fashion and commercial models need to build a strong portfolio and there are magazines and testing opportunities for both in their respective markets. Knowing where you “fit” in the modeling industry can help you aim for the right agents and markets.  If you are 5’9” to 5’11” - willowy with high cheekbones and under 21 years old, you might be considered more editorial than commercial.  If you have some curves and look amazing in a bikini, or if you are young and fresh and like to move more naturally in front of the camera, then you are probably more commercial.  If an agent tells you that you are commercial you might find yourself off to Miami or Hamburg or Tokyo, and if you are considered fashion then you will most likely be sent to NYC or Paris depending on your age, to do show castings and to meet editors.  


It’s not very common for models to transition from commercial to fashion but in some cases and model can really become known for working for a commercial brand and catch the eye of editors, reversing the trajectory of their career.  Fashion models are lucky to have three or four seasons of shows to make their mark before agents are likely to begin transitioning them to a broader more commercial market, increasing their income potential.  

Remember, it is all business and whether it is commercial or fashion, it is all work, so respect that, and always be the most professional that you can be and take advantage of the opportunity.  People will remember that  - you are your “brand”.  And don’t forget that for every one model that are tens of thousands of hopefuls who would gladly walk in your shows in a heartbeat!  

Supporting images:

Candice Swanepoel, Self Magazine, March 2015 by Sebastian Kim

Liya Kebede, Porter Magazine, Winter 2015, by Chris Colls



#newfaces #modeling #gettingintomodeling #modelingmarkets #businessofmodeling # editorialmodeling #commercialmodeling #lifestylemodeling #runwaymodeling #modelinginfo